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6 Tips For Maximizing Positive Outcomes in Travel Nursing

 

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Concept - healthcare in Africa

Although there are many things we could add to the list below.  As a former recruiter, I feel like these are some of the most important areas to keep in mind before any travel assignment!  (email me if you have some tips of your own!)

(1) Background/drug screen: An unexpected hit on a criminal background report will likely result in contract cancellation. If a charge has been expunged it may still show up in a background check and/or delay the processing of a license. Talk with your recruiter in advance if you’re concerned about any background issues. (Note. The Board of Nursing may not allow for a temporary license to be issued in some cases which will greatly increase the processing time for license issuance). Together, you’ll need to come up with a realistic timeline for starting a new position if obtaining a new state license is required. We suggest you also mention to your recruiter any prescription medications you’re taking as this may delay processing of your drug screen results. This is particularly important if you’re starting a contract on short notice.

(2) Poor fit for unit: Gather all relevant information your agency has about a position before sending your file. Have a list of questions for the manager to be sure you get the information you need about the unit and can gauge whether your experience is a good fit for their opening. Ask in advance about any on-site testing which may be required. Check out our Preparing For Your Travel Nursing Interview article for additional tips!

(3) Personality conflict: Maintain a positive and professional attitude in all situations, particularly those in which you disagree with a staff member. Articulate your understanding of the situation and make sure there is not a miscommunication. If differences of opinion are not resolved through communication seek assistance from another supervisor or manager. Remain professional in your interactions and contact your agency to discuss the situation. A good agency will work with you to identify tips for handling the situation and/or establish a plan of action to address your concerns if deemed appropriate.

(4) Unable to locate suitable/affordable housing: Before your file is sent to the hospital for review be sure to research the area to determine whether suitable housing options are available. Your agency should be able to provide a list of options they’ve used in the past and/or understand the likelihood of finding suitable housing in a given area. The more remote the location is the more likely housing will be difficult to find and keep in mind there are some parts of the country where housing costs are considerably high. If you’re accepting a position based on your ability to find housing with a specific budget in mind invest the time to find it before committing.

(5) Compensation: Before your file is sent to the hospital request a written breakdown of the pay package from your agency. Ask about cancellation policies and guarantee of hours in advance, and fully understand the consequences if you are called off or miss a shift due to illness.

(6) Paycheck concerns: Discuss the timesheet process for the hospital so you know your responsibilities to insure you are paid on time. Confirm your agency has received your timesheet each week (some agencies will actually notify you). Facsimile technology is not reliable. Utilize an app, like CamScanner, to convert photo images of your timesheet to PDF and send to your recruiter or agency as directed.

 

FREE 3-PART VIDEO TRAINING SERIES

Over 1.5 hours of free training on everything travel nursing!

it's free!
100% privacy guranteed