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Top 3 Things to Consider Before Completing Travel Agency Application

 

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Top 3 Things to Consider Before Completing Travel Agency Application

Nearly every conversation with a travel nursing recruiter ends with an awkward request to fill out an application. Many times the question is asked before you or the recruiter have enough information to know whether they can meet your needs. Rather than spending your weekend filling out several applications here are 3 items to consider:

  • Know the agency
  • Know the recruiter
  • Know thy self

(1) Know the agency. Thoroughly research the agency regarding matters that are important to you. Remember, what’s good for someone elses situation may not be good for yours. Also, be sure to research whether the agency will be sharing your information with other “sister agencies” or facilities. Many times I’ve talked to experienced travelers who were shocked to learn a company had shared their information without their permission. The bottom line is that you should only complete paperwork if the agency is able to meet your needs. And be sure to know their policy regarding information sharing.

One important fact that is frequently overlooked is the agency you select will be responsible for direct marketing your profile to the hospital. It’s a safe bet you want the agency to be professional, courteous, honest, and responsive in their dealings with the hospital. Imagine for a moment you’re working as an HR specialist for a hospital. Your job is to facilitate the hiring of travelers. You spend your work day reviewing and forwarding agency profiles to your clinical managers, reviewing health documents to be sure inbound travelers are cleared to start on time, and addressing any issues that occur once a traveler has started an assignment. If a particular agency is exceptionally good at providing quality candidates, meeting documentation deadlines, and ultimately getting candidates started on time you are likely to favor their candidates. Working with this agency makes your job easier and ultimately you gain praise from your boss for your performance. I think you can see where I’m going wth this. If an agency is poor at communicating with you, how well should you expect them to communicate with the hospital. If the agency is disorganized should they be expected to get your paperwork to the hospital on time and in order. If all else is equal but one agency performs at a higher level which agency’s candidates are you going to push to your managers. These are very real considerations that are made by hospital staff and administrators everyday. Before you start filling out paperwork make sure you know the agency can meet your needs. And don’t underestimate the importance of the agency’s performance history with the facility in landing you a contract.

(2) Know the recruiter. Most travelers will tell you it’s extremely important you work with the “right” recruiter. Your job is to figure out what “right” means for you. This sounds simple but in all honesty can be difficult. There are some good recruiters and some whom are not so good. What makes this tricky is they can sometimes sound very similar during that first conversation. Some recruiters are just simply better at their jobs than others. Like any other profession out there-there is quite honestly a difference in how much a recruiter knows from experience and how well he or she performs the job. It’s important you know exactly what you want in a recruiter. Some nurses focus on accessibility. Other’s search for the right personality. Undoubtedly all nurses want a recruiter who is honest and trustworthy. As you begin talking with recruiters you will identify one or two seem to click with. You don’t have to be ‘besties’ but you want to know there’s mutual respect. One easy way to identify this during a conversation is to gauge how well he or she is listening to you. If the recruiter isn’t listening to you before you sign a contract chances are they’re not going to listen after you start one. Whether a recruiter is a good fit for you is important to your overall success. Such a simple statement but here’s why I believe it matters. Life isn’t perfect. You’re going to forget to send a timesheet in a time or two. The charge nurse is going to dump the worst assignments on you at least once. A hospital is gonna float you to a unit you haven’t been oriented at least once along the way. You may forget to get that ACLS renewal course scheduled and it expires at the end of the month. A family emergency back home may occur. As a recruiter I’ve assisted nurses faced with each of these situations. Whether you get the support you deserve in these situations depends largely on your recruiter, their experience, and their willingness to help.

(3) Know thy self. Are you really ready to hit the road? If not, and you’re simply testing the waters to see what’s out there it probably doesn’t make sense to fill out the application. Know your intentions and communicate them up front to the recruiters you talk to. If you have a good one on the phone they’ll discourage you from filling out the information until you’re certain about your decision to travel.

Once you’ve researched the agency and given some thought to what you want in a recruiter you can be confident in your decision to complete the application process. If you’ve done well in your research you will have avoided some of the bigger headaches that come with traveling and be well on your way to a positive travel experience!

 

FREE 3-PART VIDEO TRAINING SERIES

Over 1.5 hours of free training on everything travel nursing!

it's free!
100% privacy guranteed